Nootka Sound Artist Exhibition at the Victoria Art Gallery

This exhibition takes the site of Nootka, in the traditional territories of the Nuu-chah-nulth peoples on the Pacific coast of Vancouver Island, as a case study to consider how artists have contributed to shaping the idea of place on the West Coast. Nootka was the site of first contact between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, and as such has been a subject in art since the 18th Century.

Click here for information on exhibit

 

 

Museum and Archives Society-Community Directory

If you are new to the area, or want to update/change your information or if you are a business in the community the Museum and Archives Society is compiling current information for the Community Directory.  The directory is meant to provide community information to members of both Gold River and Tsaxana and if there’s something you think we should have in there, please let us know!

All businesses in the community are welcome to be listed for free, however all proceeds over and above the cost of publishing goes to the Society, so purchasing an ad is most welcome and appreciated.  

Submit your information by:

Email to: suzannetrevis [at] gmail [dot] com 
Mail to: PO Box 985, Gold River, BC, V0P 1G0,
or in person at: the Literacy Centre, weekdays 10am – 1pm

Interested in a Tale of Old Gold River?

In early May the Gold River Archives were approached about running our William Macfarlane program for a group visiting from Campbell River. We ended up having enough people for two presentations, which was great!

Feedback was extremely good so we decided to put it out to the community to see if there is enough interest to run a few more over the summer. This is a great little glimpse into an event that happened in the area well before the community of Gold River ever existed.

Have we peaked your interest? Call and book your group today!

~ Submitted directly to The Buzz for advertisement by the Gold River Archives

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The Nootka Sound Crisis: April 29 at The Campbell River Museum

Taken from Museum at Campbell River: The Nootka Sound Crisis

In 1904, the American scholar William Manning, author of The Nootka Sound Controversy, described Friendly Cove (Yuquot) on Nootka Island: “both the Spanish and the English deserted the place.  Neither nation ever reoccupied it.  Nootka is still inhabited by Indians.”

In June 1789, the Spanish, under the leadership of Esteban Jose Martinez, built a substantial fort at Friendly Cove, on a grassy knoll below where the lighthouse stands today.  What ever became of the fort?  Why did the Spanish abandon Friendly Cove?  These and other questions about the settlement of Nootka Island will be explored by historian Catherine Gilbert in her pictorial presentation about the Nootka Sound Controversy, sometimes known as the Crisis, that in 1789, became an international incident – putting into question the sovereignty of the Pacific Northwest between the Spanish and the British.

She will discuss the events that led up to the Crisis, highlighting such scoundrels as the opportunist John Meares who precipitated the incident, and will talk about Captain George Vancouver’s visit of 1792 with Spanish Captain Juan Francisco de Bodega y Quadra.  At this historic meeting, commemorated in recent years by a beautiful stained glass window in the church at Friendly Cove, the two captains attempted to resolve their countries’ territorial dispute.

The presentation will include a discussion about the important role played by the Mowachaht, whose territory was at the centre of this dispute and the relationship between successive European captains and the powerful Mowachaht Chief Maquinna.

This presentation will take place Saturday April 29 from 1 to 3pm and the cost is $7 per person.

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